What’s next for universities after Brexit?

On Monday, The Times published a piece in which the newspaper’s international correspondent, Paul J. Browne, wrote that he would be stepping down from his position at The Times following the publication of this article.

This is significant because Browne has been critical of the UK’s exit from the EU.

As the Times article explains, Browne has written that the UK should have stayed in the EU as early as 2020 and then “refocused” on making it a great place to do business and the country “could have done so at much lower cost and at much greater ease”.

“In fact, if the UK had kept in the union after 2020, the cost of living in Britain would have been lower than it is now,” Browne wrote.

“But even that figure is a very low one: the true potential of the economy is much bigger. “

The most likely case is that the economy would have expanded by 4.6 per cent.” “

But even that figure is a very low one: the true potential of the economy is much bigger.

The most likely case is that the economy would have expanded by 4.6 per cent.”

At the same time, the Times quoted Browne as saying that he thought that the country should be “wasting” its time on Brexit and that “a vote to leave” was a “mistake”.

This is not the first time that Browne has expressed views similar to those of the Times.

Earlier this year, he wrote a column for the British newspaper The Independent, in which he called Brexit a “sad, cruel, cowardly and self-defeating decision”.

He said that the referendum was a failure, and that the consequences for the country were “very real”.

As Browne writes, “Brexit was a very bad idea, and it has caused great harm and damage.”

It seems that Browne will continue to do so.

Related Post